Ulriksdal Palace – Ulriksdals Slott

Stopped by Ulriksdal Palace to enjoy the lovely regal view but also to take a wander in their fabulously symmetrical palace garden. The bosque was designed by famous Hårleman and makes a big change from the free flowing nature mess that I’m dealing with in my personal garden. I’m tempted to get one of these stylish iron gates to shut my garden behind and just let the wild flow at its own free will. It would be preferable if all of the bugs and insects would stay behind the iron gate as well, I’m not a big fan of the creepy crawlers that I’ve recently met.

Ulriksdal Palace was originally known as Jakobsdal after its owner Jacob De la Gardie, who commissioned the architect Hans Jacob Kristler in 1643-1645 to build a country retreat in the Renaissance style. It wasn’t until Queen Dowager Hedvig Eleonora purchased the Palace in 1669 that the palace began to take its current form. In 1684, she gave the palace to her newborn grandson Prince Ulrik, and it was thereafter known as Ulriksdal.

Could gardening get any better than this? Beautifully cut green grass, tightly trimmed hedges in sharp squares and straight lines, a fountain and wild boar statues as that extra fierce detail. Such a triumph to see!

The garden also showed examples of how they were traditional used for the very practical reason of providing food for the dashing people living in the palace. Talk about sustainable living, who needs an organic supermarket when you can instead take a short walk into your garden and pick up whatever you fancy. My garden would be filled with darling berries such as blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, grapes and other delicious finger foods that I could casually snack on while reclining on my stylishly draped chaise longue. What would be in your garden?

I bravely decided to give nature another go by smelling some of the beautiful flowers found in the garden.

This lovely building seen in the distance is the orangery museum which houses not only plants, but also an exhibition of Swedish sculptures from the 1700s-1900s from the Swedish National Museum’s collection.

My favorite flower/plant from the otherwise vast collection.

The Palace Chapel, executed in a Dutch neo-Renaissance style, with inspiration from Venice was designed by architect Fredrik Wilhelm Scholander. It was inaugurated by Queen Lovisa on her name day, August 25, 1865.

By a small body of water on the property of Ulriksdal Palace stand a duo of statues called “Blackamoors Pulling Net”. They were executed by artist Pehr Henrik Lundgren in 1845 for Haga Park. Now the statues stand here, by Igelbäcken. The statues stand on both sides of the water that is connected by a bridge and the two men are seen gathering fish with their nets cast out into the canal.

If you’re wondering why I enjoy visiting palaces so much, the answer is simple. It’s because it’s like time travel, visiting another century only has to be a short car ride away. It’s also extremely fascinating learning about what life would have been like in the 18th century for example. I think I would have fit in perfectly with a powdered wig and a darling wide gown. But then again, I’m romanticizing the time, imagine living without electricity, heating, and so many other luxuries that we enjoy regularly. What century would you choose to travel to?

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