Inside Rolls-Royce

Rolls Royce BespokeI recently visited the Inside Rolls-Royce exhibition at Saatchi Gallery here in London where the luxury car brand took center stage in order to highlight their use of exquisite materials, superior craftsmanship, customization and high-tech specs.

Audience interaction with an emphasis on innovative technology were the main focus points of the multi-sensory exhibition. Digital installations were featured, one of which could transform you into the iconic kneeling lady statuette that adorns every Rolls-Royce motor car. You could also race the luxury cars albeit only through video games.

Rolls-Royce EngineA motto to live by: ‘look for the best and make it better, and if it doesn’t exist, design it’ as it says on the Rolls-Royce website.

Rolls-Royce Car InteriorSo what model would I choose? Even though I’m not a bad ass rapper or a mafia boss, we have the same taste for champagne, expensive jewelry and luxury cars so I’d probably choose a model with tinted, bullet-proof windows from their timeless Phantom family like my man 50 cent. What would you choose?

Frieze London 2014

Frieze Art FairFor those of you who didn’t manage to make it to the big Frieze Art Fair that took over Regent’s Park between October 15-18, here comes a glimpse into Frieze London. Now it wasn’t only the heavy weights of the art world that descended but the baby pram club did as well (urgh). Despite Frieze occupying a vast amount of space, there simply wasn’t enough of it to accommodate the SUV of prams (the twin pram in double width).

Frieze Art Fair 2014Regardless, it was interesting to see what each gallery chose to promote. The art was of course of varying quality but there were a few select pieces that I would have liked to bring home with me and many that I wouldn’t have taken even if I got them for free.

Kevin Francis GrayKevin Francis Gray.

Yoshitomo Nara, Beh!, 2014Yoshitomo Nara, Beh!, 2014, acrylic on canvas.

Frieze 2014

Ella KruglyanskayaElla Kruglyanskaya.

Takashi Murakami, Cosmic Truth, 2014Takashi Murakami, Cosmic Truth, 2014, acrylic on canvas on aluminum frame.

Condé Nast – Brides the Show

Vicky Rowe Wedding Dresses Now what could be better than spending a magical evening getting inspired by Condé Nast Brides the Show – Where Stylish Weddings Start? Everything from flowers, gowns, stationery, cakes, venues, classic cars and honeymoon destinations are presented to the plenty at the fair which began this evening and runs until 4pm on October 5th at Business Design Center, Islington. The stunning wedding dresses featured above, which look as though they might have come straight from the set of a lavish party as seen on Downton Abbey are by designer Vicky Rowe.Luxury event styling and design by Platinum Raspberry. Platinum Raspberry
Wedding CakeSo whether you have a groom or not, stop by and get some inspiration and contacts for your next big fête. I’m seriously tempted to pick up a big, beautiful bridal cake to celebrate that it’s Friday, who’s with me? Have a great weekend!

A Matinee at the Royal Opera House

Royal Opera House Interior, Covent Garden LondonI’m now back in London and what better way to toast my return than with a glass of bubbly during the intermission of a terrific matinee performance enjoyed from the orchestra stalls of the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden.

Manon at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden LondonManon, The Royal Opera House © ROH / Johan Persson 2011.

The performance was Kenneth MacMillan’s highly acclaimed ballet Manon which has an intriguingly scandalous story but with a tragic end.

A few months prior I’d seen the opera performance of Manon (also at the Royal Opera House) and absolutely fell in love so I was excited to see how the opera and ballet performances differed when it came to dealing with the same story. Both performances were enchanting with spectacular costumes, props, sets, vocals (opera), and dancing (ballet). The music differed completely between the two performances as instead of relying on Massenet or Puccini’s score of Manon Lescaut, MacMillan used lesser-known music by Massenet.

Royal Opera House London

After a performance I leaving feeling as if I’m on cloud nine and as graceful as the prima ballerina. The last performance is on November 1st so hurry up and catch it before it ends as its definitely worthwhile.

The First Georgians at The Queen’s Gallery

The First Georgians Exhibition The Queen's Gallery Buckingham PalaceThe Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace is currently exhibiting The First Georgians: Art & Monarchy 1714-1760. Now I’m not sure if it’s baby George that’s causing a bit of a Georgian hype/revival with several exhibitions and a BBC tv mini-series with Lucy Worsley entitled The First Georgians: The German Kings Who Made Britain recently aired. Regardless, my lust after fine paintings, etchings, sculpture, porcelain and furniture drew me out.

The Queen's Gallery Buckingham Palace

William Hogarth

The exhibition explores the taste and royal patronage of George I and George II in a period of dramatic change across Britain. Satirist William Hogarth’s moralizing art print series including  A Harlot’s Progress, 1734 and Marriage à-la-Mode, 1745 tell cautionary stories.

The First Georgians Exhibition Buckingham Palace

 

Chelsea PlatesChelsea plate, soft-paste porcelain, c.1755.

Botanical Illustration

The First Georgians ExhibitionMeissen porcelain tea and coffee service, c.1730.

Georgian English Furniture

The First Georgians Exhibition Buckingham PalaceThis would make a suitably fierce, regal throne/desk chair to help me make those tough decisions from while writing my dissertation. Though I’m not entirely convinced over its comfort in the long run.

Georgian Furniture

South of the River Thames

London City ArchitectureThe view from south of the river Thames features quite a few iconic views of the ever changing London cityscape. Among them are 30 St Mary Axe (the Gherkin) which now looks like a little squirt compared to 20 Fenchurch Street (the Walkie Talkie building).

The Tower of LondonThe Tower of London.

Tower Bridge LondonTower Bridge.

City Hall London SouthwarkNew City Hall designed by Norman Foster. Southwark, London.

Bond in Motion at the London Film Museum

Bond in Motion Aston Martin DB5Aston Martin DB5 as seen in Golden Eye, 1995.

Now who doesn’t love an evening spent watching good James Bond films? When I saw that the London Film Museum in Covent Garden was putting on a James Bond exhibition or more accurately Bond in Motion exhibition – ‘the largest official collection of original James Bond vehicles’ I reveled. It’s a terrific exhibition that displays the high performance luxury machinery tweaked with a few unique add-ons (courtesy of Q) that are central to the iconic chases and pursuits of the oh so suave James Bond.

James Bond Exhibition London Film MuseumThe essential Bond accessories consist of a gun, cash, a black American Express card and cufflinks.

London Film Museum James Bond Exhibition

Bond in Motion London Film MuseumStunning vehicles such as the Aston Martin DB5 and DBS, Rolls-Royce Phantom III and Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II are on display along with a selection of more creative action vehicles such as the submersible Lotus Esprit S1 and the crocodile submarine. A variety of aircrafts, motorcycles and boats are also on display and despite what the name suggests the exhibition also includes a few other props used in the film franchise.

Bond in Motion London Film Museum

Bond in Motion London Film MuseumFilming car scene for Quantum of Solace, 2008.

Bond in Motion London Film MuseumAston Martin DBS as seen in Quantum of Solace, 2008 along with the bumps, scratches and damaged windshield following the stunts.

Linnea Nilsson at Bond In Motion - London Film MuseumYours truly enthusiastically got dressed up in a tux with bow tie to have an impromptu Bond themed photo shoot. Lights, camera, action!

London Film Museum James Bond Exhibition

London Film Museum James Bond ExhibitionExterior MI building model. Michael Lamont. The World is Not Enough.

London Film Museum James Bond ExhibitionExamples of elaborate storyboards that look like proper comics such as this for The World Is Not Enough shows a visual layout of events as they are to be seen through the camera lens and demonstrates the creative process of the production company’s art department.

Bond in Motion Rolls-Royce Phantom III

Rolls-Royce Phantom III as seen in Goldfinger, 1964.